A Cultural Guide to China and the Cincinnati Chinese Community – Part 2

Week 5 – World Affairs Council Cultural Guides

Jin Kong, Greater Cincinnati Chinese Chamber of Commerce Board Chair, has been working at the Greater Cincinnati World Affairs Council (GCWAC) for six months through a fellowship with The Mission Continues. He is looking to “receive a better understanding of the populist sentiment towards immigrants in Cincinnati.” Through this research, Kong will be sharing weekly blog posts through GCWAC’s website on Chinese culture in Cincinnati. Click here to read more of his blogs.

China – Part 2 – A Cultural Guide to China and the Cincinnati Chinese Community

Language and Culture

China has over 1.3 billion people representing 56 ethnic minority groups. The largest is the Han Chinese with about 900 million people. There are five legal religions in China: Buddhism, Taoism, Islam, Catholicism, and Protestantism. Confucianism is technically not considered a religion but a state sponsored philosophy. However, it does take on some religious characteristics.

There are seven major dialects of the Chinese language. The most spoken is Mandarin. Wu is spoken by about 8% of the population followed by Cantonese with 5% of the population speaking it. The lesser known dialects are: Xiang (spoken by 5% of the population), Hakka (4%), and Gan (2%).

Cincinnati is the home to many Chinese who speak different dialects. Most of the Chinese that immigrated to Cincinnati before the early 1990’s are from Taiwan or Hong Kong or other southern regions of China. They mostly speak Hakka or Cantonese. After 1990, a rush of “Mainlanders” came to Cincinnati from China. They mostly speak Mandarin. There is no census data on what ethnic groups comprise of the Chinese population here in Cincinnati.

Food

Food is important to the Chinese. Despite what you see in the United State, Chinese food is as diverse as China’s language and customs. There are eight major regional cuisine styles: Yue, Chuan, Su, Zhe, Min, Ziang, Hui, and Lu.

Yue Cuisine originates from the Guangdong/Canton region. It is the most popular internationally. It is commonly sweeter favoring braising and stewing.

Chuan Cuisine originates from the Sichuan region and is famous for being spicy and bold. Chuan Cuisine is known to use a lot of garlic, ginger, and peanuts.

Su Cuisine originates from the Jiangsu province and Shanghai. It’s usually fresh, salty and sweet. It is known for the precision of cooking methods favoring seafood, soup, and colorful presentation. It is known to be refined and gourmet.

Zhe Cuisine originates from Zhejiang (south of Jiangsu). It is mellow using fresh fish, bamboo, and various cooking methods. It is similar to Su Cuisine but less elaborate.

Min Cuisine originates from Fujian. It is known to be lighter with sweet and sour taste using ingredients from the sea and the mountains.

Xiang Cuisine originates from Hunan. It is probably spicier than Chuan Cuisine. But unlike Chuan, Xiang Cuisine does not peppercorn so it is not a numbing spiciness. The techniques of Xiang Cuisine usually involve stir-fry, steaming, and smoking.

Hui Cuisine originates from Anhui. It tends to use wild plants and animals for ingredients favoring stewing and using more oil.

Lu Cuisine originates from Shangdong and is a northern style of cooking. Seafood is a favorite and often cooked with simple ingredients. Unlike southern Chinese food, northern cooking usually involves less rice and more wheat-based food such as noodles. Lu Cuisine also is known for its use of vinegar.

Cincinnati is the home of many Chinese restaurants. The earliest record of a Chinese restaurateur is probably Mr. Wong Yie. Mr. Wong Yie began with a small café on Walnut Street sometimes in the 1910’s. He opened his full-size restaurant and ballroom on the northwest corner of Sixth and Main in 1921. (“ORIENT IS VISUALIZED: By Guests at Opening of Chinese Restaurant and Ballroom.” Cincinnati Enquirer, Nov 15, 1921).

Today, Cincinnatians can taste Yue Cuisine in most Chinese restaurants, albeit much Americanized. There are a few well-known Chuan Cuisine places most notably Sichuan Chili next to Cam Market on Reading Road. The head chef at Sichuan Chili, Zhao, is a native to Sichuan. He began cooking at age 15 and has served as head chef of restaurants in Sichuan, Beijing, and Chicago.

China is also famous for noodles. Over the centuries, many different styles of noodles developed in China. One notable style is called “La” (pulling). Noodles are made by pulling, stretching, and folding dough repeatedly until it becomes very thin. You can try this type of noodle at the Fortune Noodle House in Clifton. They are also set up so you can actually see the chef “pull” these noodles.

The Arts

The ancient Chinese are avid writers and philosophers. There is a rich history of literary work in China most famously the “Four Major Works” – Romance of the Three Kingdoms, Water Margin, Journey to the West, and Dream of the Red Chamber.

The Chinese also pay attention to the development of both body and mind in its artistic endeavors. Kung Fu is developed not only as a self-defense technique, but also a way to advance the mind and the spirit.

Chines musical instruments are classified into eight categories: silk, bamboo, wood, stone, metal, clay, gourd, and skin. The Chinese Opera is a popular form of entertainment. It is often high-pitched and tells of famous stories that children learn from a young age. The styles of opera are many and characters of an operate are usually marked by painted faces.

Authentic Chinese music is making an appearance in Cincinnati. The Greater Cincinnati Chinese Music Society has been putting on annual performances to introduce Cincinnatians to traditional Chinese music and instruments. This year’s (2017) concert presented a Kun Qu Opera, “the crown jewel of hundreds of local Chinese operas with a rich history of over 600 years.” The concert also featured an Er Hu player Lu Yiwen and a Dizi player Wan Junkan. They performed alongside CCM Philharmonia orchestra directed by Maestro Mark Gibson.

Celebrations

The major celebration of the Chinese is its lunar new year, or The Spring Festival. It usually falls between January and February depending on the lunar calendar. It is a 15-day celebration marked by family gatherings, food preparations, fireworks, and customs and traditions such as dragon dance and paper lanterns.

Chinese New Year celebrations have been a long tradition in Cincinnati. The earliest record dates back to 1894. The Cincinnati Enquirer editorial noted Sam Kee’s laundry closing down for the lunar new year and celebrating with close to 30 Chinese living in Cincinnati at the time. (“’SUN NIN,’: The Chinese New-Year’s Day, Celebrated By Cincinnati Celestials with Much Ecla.” Cincinnati Enquirer, Feb 6, 1894).

In 1921, Mr. Wong Yie celebrated Chinese New Year with some 500 Cincinnatians with some notable judges and city council members. The Postmaster gave the celebrating toast. (“RARE FEAST IS SERVED: By Wong Yie, Chinese Restaurateur, To Host of Friends.” Cincinnati Enquirer, Jan 4, 1921).

Today, there are many Chinese lunar new year celebrations in Cincinnati. Most large companies (e.g., 5/3 Bank) have their own Employee Resource Groups and they host new year banquets. Additionally, the Greater Cincinnati Chinese Chamber of Commerce hosts a new year celebration each year and many Cincinnatians have been in attendance in the past.

Jin Kong is a fellow through Mission Continues working with GCWAC. Original articles found here.

The Greater Cincinnati World Affairs Council (GCWAC) is a 501(c)(3) international non-profit organization that builds global understanding and promotes international awareness through education, information, and exchange of people and ideas. We work in cooperation with the government, companies, as well as cultural and educational bodies. CLICK HERE for more information.

The Mission Continues is a national nonprofit organization that empowers veterans who are adjusting to life at home to find purpose through community impact. Their operations in cities across the country deploy veteran volunteers alongside non-profit partners and community leaders to solve some of the most challenging issues facing our communities: improving community education resources, eliminating food deserts, mentoring at-risk youth and more. Through this unique model, veterans build new skills and networks that help them successfully reintegrate into life after the military while making long-term, sustainable transformations in communities and inspiring future generations to serve. CLICK HERE for more information.

A Historical Guide to China and Chinese Immigration to Cincinnati

Week 4 – World Affairs Council Cultural Guides

Jin Kong, Greater Cincinnati Chinese Chamber of Commerce Board Chair, has been working at the Greater Cincinnati World Affairs Council (GCWAC) for six months through a fellowship with The Mission Continues. He is looking to “receive a better understanding of the populist sentiment towards immigrants in Cincinnati.” Through this research, Kong will be sharing weekly blog posts through GCWAC’s website on Chinese culture in Cincinnati. Click here to read more of his blogs.

China – Part 1 – A Historical Guide to China and Chinese Immigration to Cincinnati

Terracotta

China’s recorded history began some four-thousand years ago. Three dynasties preceded the unification of China in 221 BCE: Xia (2070 BCE), Shang (1600 BCE), Zhou (1046 BCE). The Zhou period is a time of flourishing civilization. The writing was codified and ironwork became more sophisticated. China saw the rise of philosophers such as Confucius and Lao-Zi (Taoism) in this period.

During the mid-Zhou dynasty, power was decentralized and China entered what is known as the “Spring and Autumn Waring Period” (722-221 BCE). Sun-Zi and The Art of War emerged during this time. China was fractured into seven kingdoms. In 221 BCE, the Kingdom of Qin subdued the other six and proclaimed its king, Ying Zheng, the First Emperor of China – “Qin ShiHuang.”

During Qin ShiHuang’s reign, writing and measurements were unified under a single system; government rule was centralized; trade was made easier by uniformed currency and standardized width of cart-wheels. Qin-ShiHuang was also famous for building the first section of The Great Wall of China and his “Terracotta Army” which accompanied him to his tomb.

Many dynasties followed Qin. Most notably the Tang Dynasty, which was known as China’s golden age (618-907 AD); the Song Dynasty, which saw great scientific and technological advancements (960-1279 AD); and Ming Dynasty, which saw the completion of the Great Wall and the Forbidden City (1368-1644 AD). The last dynasty of China, (Qing) was ruled by the Manchus and ended in 1911. The Qing dynasty was succeeded by China’s modern republic age and eventually saw the rise of the People’s Republic of China in 1949.

During the Qing dynasty (in 1868), the United States and China entered into the Burlingame Treaty. This treaty established a formal relationship between the two countries. China was granted “most favored nation” status and immigration were encouraged. The first wave of Chinese immigrants arrived in the United States between the 1850s to 1880s. They mostly settled along the coasts (in California or New York). Most Chinese immigrants were labors working to build railroads.

In the 1870s, there were repeated efforts to limit Chinese immigration to the United States. The Fifteen Passenger Bill of 1879 limited the number of Chinese passengers to 15 in any single voyage to the United States. President Rutherford B. Hayes vetoed the bill because it violated the terms of the Burlingame Treaty.

Chinese Exclusion

Following the veto, President Hayes sent James Burrill Angell to China and he successfully negotiated a new treaty allowing restrictions on Chinese immigration. Following the Angell Treaty of 1880 was the passage of the infamous Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882. This Act was not repealed until 1943 under the Magnuson Act. Following the repeal, the second wave of Chinese immigrants to the US began from the late 1970s to the present.

The first Chinese migrants in Ohio were mostly descendants of Chinese immigrants who had settled on the West Coast. A majority of them moved to northeastern Ohio (Cleveland area). Some came to Cincinnati and made this region their home. According to a local new paper report of the Census Bureau account, there were 17 Chinese living in Cincinnati in 1910 (“SEVENTEEN CHINESE: And Seven Japanese Lived in Cincinnati in 1910, Report Says.” SPECIAL DISPATCH TO THE ENQUIRER, Nov 28, 1914). However, as early as 1894, the Cincinnati Enquirer reported Chinese New Year Celebration by about 30 Chinese men led by a laundry shop owner Sam Kee (“‘SUN NIN,’: The Chinese New-Year’s Day, Celebrated By Cincinnati Celestials with Much Eclat.” Cincinnati Enquirer, Feb 6, 1894). In 1876, the first Chinese American reportedly voted in Cincinnati. (“The First Chinese Voter.” Cincinnati Enquirer, Apr 4, 1876). In 1912, the Enquirer reported the first woman and child immigrant moving to Cincinnati (“CHINESE: Wife and Child Coming To Take Up Their Residence in Cincinnati – Similar Distinction May Be Given Covington.” Cincinnati Enquirer, Sep 26, 1912). In 1914, the Cincinnati Enquirer reported  the first Chinese Baby born here to Mr. and Mrs. Wong Yie at their Vine Street restaurant (“CHINESE BABY, First To Be Born in Cincinnati, Is Christened Wong Gut Ting in Fathers Home.” Cincinnati Enquirer, Jun 8, 1914).

Today, thousands of Chinese descendants call the Greater Cincinnati region their home. Thousands more immigrate to Cincinnati to work or attend school. There are more than a dozen active Chinese community organizations in this region doing all sorts of charitable work. Most notably, the Greater Cincinnati Chinese Chamber of Commerce, the Cincinnati Chinese Society, the Chinese American Association of Cincinnati, the Cincinnati Chinese Church, and the Cincinnati Chinese Culture Learning Association.

Jin Kong is a fellow through Mission Continues working with GCWAC. Original articles found here.

The Greater Cincinnati World Affairs Council (GCWAC) is a 501(c)(3) international non-profit organization that builds global understanding and promotes international awareness through education, information, and exchange of people and ideas. We work in cooperation with the government, companies, as well as cultural and educational bodies. CLICK HERE for more information.

The Mission Continues is a national nonprofit organization that empowers veterans who are adjusting to life at home to find purpose through community impact. Their operations in cities across the country deploy veteran volunteers alongside non-profit partners and community leaders to solve some of the most challenging issues facing our communities: improving community education resources, eliminating food deserts, mentoring at-risk youth and more. Through this unique model, veterans build new skills and networks that help them successfully reintegrate into life after the military while making long-term, sustainable transformations in communities and inspiring future generations to serve. CLICK HERE for more information.

Photos from 2017 Lunar New Year Gala

         

Thank you to all of you who joined and supported us last Friday for our 2017 “Building Bridges” Lunar New Year Gala, Sponsored by Fifth Third Bank! The Greater Cincinnati Chinese Chamber of Commerce celebrated the Year of the Rooster in style with over 350 members of our region’s Chinese and international business communities.

Please visit our Facebook page to see more photos from our signature annual event!

Click here for Gala Photos

Coalition for Immigrant Dignity

COALITION FOR IMMIGRANT DIGNITY

COALITION FOR IMMIGRANT DIGNITY FORMS, ISSUES RESPONSE TO PRESIDENT TRUMP’S ACTION ON IMMIGRATION ENFORCEMENT


Yesterday afternoon, President  Trump announced two executive actions regarding immigration, including construction of a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border and several aggressive strategies to enforce our nation’s outmoded immigration laws. The orders are unworkable, irrational, and wrong.

These policies have one basic goal – fostering divisions harmful divisions among cities, among co-workers, among parishioners and neighbors. But the people of Greater Cincinnati will not be divided. Here in this town President Trump’s efforts will fail.

In our beloved community we remain devoted to unity – committed to basic human decency for all.

To celebrate this unity we have formed the Coalition for Immigrant Dignity, an alliance of labor, civil rights, faith, and charitable groups. Coalition members are employers and employees. We are clergy and parishioners, clients and social workers, students and teachers, vendors and clients, patients and care givers, parents and children, sons and daughters.

We are first generation, we are 12th generation, we are new arrivals – refugees, visa holders, and others patiently waiting for an opportunity to enter on the pathway to citizenship. We are citizens and immigrants together. We believe in one another.

30 years have now gone by since Washington D.C. leaders came together to craft comprehensive updates to the nation’s immigration laws. A generation’s worth of D.C. leaders have failed to deliver needed changes. With these executive orders, the nation’s collective failure is now occupying center stage.

All who oppose these orders are encouraged to join our local Coalition for Immigrant Dignity.

Our coalition brings thousands of men and women together, makes them members one of another. We will share with one another common tools for common goals.  We will educate, advocate and organize to oppose unjust deportations, defend the DACA program, and prevent harassment and bullying in all forms.  Our goals are goals for all America – and our enemies are the enemies of all progress. The two cannot be separated.

Join us at our next meeting.  For more information email info@cworkers.org or 513-621-5991

 

移民尊严联

移民尊严联盟已经组建,并且对特朗普总统在移民问题上的行动做出了反应


昨天下午,特朗普总统发布了对移民方面的两个行政行动包括在美墨边境上修建一堵墙和一些激进的、为了加强我国过时的移民法律的策略 然而这些命令是不可行的,不合理的,并且是错误的

这些政策有一个基本目的 – 在城市之间,同事之间,教区居民和邻居之间造成危害性极大的分裂 但大辛辛那提的人民并不会因此而分裂。 这个城市,特朗普总统的努力将会失败

在我们所爱的社区,我们仍然致力于团结 – 为所有人致力于基本美德的建设

为了庆祝这个团结,我们成立了移民尊严联盟,一个代表了工人,民权,信仰和慈善机构的联盟 联盟成员包括雇主和雇员 是牧师和教区居民,客户和社会工作者,学生和教师,供应商和客户,患者和护理人员,父母和孩子,儿子和女儿

们是第一代,我们也是第十二代,同时,们也是刚到来的难民,签证持有人,和其他耐心等待着机会去获得公民权的人 们同是公民和移民 并且们相互信任彼此

自从华盛顿特区的领导人齐聚一堂,对全国移民法进行全面更新之来,已经过去了三十 一代首都特领导者的努力未能传达必要的改变 随着这些行政命令,国家的集体失败现在正在占据着舞台的中心

我们鼓励所有反对这些命令的人加入我们当地的移民尊严联盟

们的联盟将成千上万的男和女团结在一起,使他们一个接一个的成为我们的成员 们将分享对同一目标的共同资源 们将教育,倡导和组织反对不公正的驱逐出境,维护DACA计划,并且防止各种形式的骚扰和欺凌 们的目标即是全美国的目标 – 们的敌人即是所有阻碍进步的敌人两者不能分开。

在我们下次集会的时候加入我们!想了解更多的信息,请电邮 info@cworkers.org 或致电 513-621-5991

BOARD MEMBER PROFILE: CHERYL YOUNG

Chinese Chamber Board Member Profile

Cheryl Young, Assistant Provost for Global Initiatives, Miami University

Cheryl Young is the assistant provost for global education at Miami University. She is a long time staff member at Miami University, with over 30 years of experience in higher education. Cheryl leads the Global Initiatives center at Miami, which includes Study Abroad, International Student & Scholars Services, Continuing Education, the Confucius Institute, and the Center for American & World Culture.

As an international education professional, as well as an experienced administrator in continuing higher education, Cheryl brings multiple perspectives to international education and enthusiastically embraces the ideals of extended and lifelong learning in formal, informal, and virtual settings in local and global locations.

Cheryl has an academic background in English Literature and Educational Curriculum and Leadership, with degrees from Miami University and the Wellesley Institute for Leadership & Management in Higher Education.

Cheryl in a resident of Oxford, Ohio, and enjoys traveling the world in pursuit of learning opportunities, connections to cultural diversity, and promoting Miami University global initiatives. Cheryl joined the Greater Cincinnati Chinese Chamber of Commerce’s Board of Directors in July 2016.

New Member Spotlight: EB5 of Ohio

EB5 of Ohio is a local EB-5 Regional Center in Cincinnati, OH.

The EB-5 Immigrant Investor Program is a federally-sponsored investment program coordinated by the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).  The goal of the program is to facilitate the flow of foreign investment in the U.S. economy and promote the creation of U.S. jobs.

The EB-5 program provides foreign nationals with the opportunity to become conditional residents upon making an investment of $1 million, or $500,000 if in a designated Targeted Employment Area (TEA).  The investment must be in new commercial enterprise and the investment must create, directly or indirectly, ten (10) new jobs for U.S. workers.  Once this requirement is met, the investor may obtain permanent residency.

EB5 of Ohio was founded by Nigerian American Chinedum Ndukwe.  The son of two Nigerian immigrants, Chinedum played for the Cincinnati Bengals for 4 years, and upon retirement, launched Kingsley and Co., a real estate investment and development firm.  Chinedum was attracted to the EB5 program because it creates local jobs, stimulates the local economy, is a helpful tool for immigration, and is a great resource for developers as it offers low interest financing.

BOARD MEMBER PROFILE: JIN KONG

Chinese Chamber Board Member Profile

Jin Kong – Social Entrepreneur, Attorney, Adventurer

2016-17 Board Chair, Greater Cincinnati Chinese Chamber of Commerce

jin

Jin Kong (孔进, 字 德昌), Esq., was born in the Gobi and grew up in Beijing. He came to Cincinnati at age 12 and attended Walnut Hills High School. After college, Jin enlisted in the U.S. Army as a combat medic and was deployed to Mosul, Iraq, in 2004 with the 1-24 infantry battalion. He was honorably discharge in 2006 and worked for The American Legion National Headquarters in Indianapolis thereafter. Jin attended IU Robert H McKinney School of Law at night and after graduating in 2013, he went to work for a large regional full service firm focusing his practice in health care, regulatory compliance, and international business. Jin is an Applied Lean Six Sigma Black Belt certified by International Society for Six Sigma Certifications and a LEED GA by U.S. Green Building Council. He currently practices law part-time at Kong Esq., LLC and focuses on China, non-profits, social startups, health care (Medicare and Medicaid), elder law (Social Security), and community advocacy.

As a Social Entrepreneur, Jin is the Founder and Pathfinder of BrainBox ltd, a boutique consulting company focused on making sustainability simple and doing good measurable. BrainBox takes a proprietary process-based approach to help clients realize value in their triple (social, environmental, and economic) bottom-line. Additionally, BrainBox applies Lean Six Sigma principles to helping clients, non-profits and social enterprises, measure their impact by establishing logic models and data points in order to continuously improve. BrainBox offers workshops, guidebooks, and tailored consulting services based on client’s needs and budget.

In addition to BrainBox ltd, Jin is working with a team of professionals on a multilingual publishing and technology startup. The goal of this startup is to promote Cincinnati’s people and places through authentic stories, connect the city’s culture and heritage through quality content, make available a resource guide in many languages, and promote the region’s businesses, organizations, events and activities through printed books, web portals, mobile applications, and iBeacons.

Jin spends his leisure time writing on Confucian Merchant Philosophy and its overlap with modern day social entrepreneurship. His hope is to help inspire a global culture of human resilience grounded in virtue and wholeness.

Providers and Hospitals Prohibited Against Discrimination

Providers and Hospitals Prohibited Against Discrimination and Expected to Provide Language Assistance to those with Limited English Proficiencies

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) in May of this year released its final rule implementing Section 1557 of the Affordable Care Act. This Section prohibits discrimination based on race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability in certain health programs and activities receiving funding from HHS (e.g., Medicare and Medicaid, and Health Insurance Marketplace participants).

This final rule incorporates Title VI of the Civil Rights Act. It does not, however, specify whether Section 1557 prohibits against discrimination re sexual orientation; but it is worth noting that HHS prohibits such discrimination “as a matter of policy.” Covered entity under this final rule (not to be confused with HIPAA’s “covered entity”) are also required to take reasonable steps to provide meaningful access to those individuals with limited English proficiency (e.g., provide oral and written translations).

Hospitals and providers are required to be in full compliance by October 16, 2016. Please note there is a private right of action (including class action) under this Section 1557.

You can find the final rule here: https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2016-05-18/pdf/2016-11458.pdf

HHS’ policy on Prohibition Against National Origin Discrimination Affecting Limited English Proficient Persons is here: https://www.justice.gov/sites/default/files/crt/legacy/2010/12/14/hhsrevisedlepguidance_0.pdf