July Newsletter 商会简报

Building on our Successful Trade Mission

What we were able to accomplish in our 2018 China Trade Mission were incredible. In as little as 17 days, the Chinese Chamber trade delegation visited 11 cities with 145 million population in total and 2.65 trillion USD in GDP. We came back with two signed agreement to build friendship cities relationship between Cincinnati and Chongqing, and West Chester and Jiaozhou. Subsequently, the Mayor of Chongqing, Mr. Tang Liangzhi, came to visit Cincinnati on May 24, 2019. Mayor Cranley received the delegation in his office and received a letter of invitation from Mr. Tang to attend the Smart China Expo, held in Chongqing from August 26 to 29.

The Chinese Chamber once again took on the responsibility to organize Midwestern businesses to go exhibit at the Smart China Expo. While the Expo itself is little known to many, it is a very high level expo co-organize by the top state-level ministries in China, such as the Ministry of Science & Technology, the Ministry of Industries and Information Technologies and the State Academy of Science, etc. It aims to promote trade and technological advancements in emerging industries such as big data, smart cities, artificial intelligence, smart grid, smart homes, smart driving, as well as more conventional industries such as precision and advanced manufacturing and materials. Applications of such technological advancements can be used for consumer and industrial segments and are considered in high demand for the China market in the years to come.

Midwestern businesses in the US can benefit from exhibiting at this expo and engaging in dialogues with business partners and professionals attending the expo. The Chinese Chamber has secured a booth designated to the Midwestern Regional with 1500 square feet at the Expo.

Give us a shout if you are interested in joining our delegation

We’re happy to announce that REDI Cincinnati has sponsored the expo once again and we welcome Midwestern businesses to contact us for opportunities to collaborate at this expo.


Artificial Intelligence in PA

The Chinese Chamber has done such a great job, we now have businesses from Wisconsin, Pennsylvania and several other Midwestern states joining the chamber. In a recent visit to Pittsburgh, Executive Director Leo Chan reached an agreement with the Pittsburgh team to launch a local chapter. This chapter will help the Chamber service Western PA area with more focused efforts as the region is booming with emerging industries especially in the artificial intelligence (AI) sector.

We have invited speakers from the University of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Mellon University, Uber AI, Labs and Argo AI, all are leading players in the automated driving and artificial intelligence business. There will be a lunch and learn to celebrate the local chapter launch and these speakers will share views on the industry latest development trends.

Stay tuned for more information soon!

Voyage of the Red Violin Concert

Greater Cincinnati Chinese Chamber of Commerce in collaboration with Cincinnati Chamber Orchestra is proud to present Voyage of the Red Violin Concert. The legendary “Mendelssohn” Stradivarius violin that inspired the film The Red Violin is coming to Cincinnati. The fictionalized voyage of this violin through the centuries creates a musical blueprint for this concert that will take us to contrasting musical worlds. Concert will begin in China, one of the stops for the violin, with music by composers who grew up during the Cultural Revolution when classical music was forbidden.

Saturday, August 18 at 7:30PM

Members Networking Event: Festo Corporation

05.31 – Members Networking Event: Festo Corporation

Greater Cincinnati Chinese Chamber of Commerce is proud to present a Members Only Event on May 31, 2018. Members who are interested please register below for an exclusive guided tour of Festo Corp. facility in Mason, OH followed by a company presentation and working lunch. If any questions please contact Leo Chan 513.501.3087.

All Chamber Members please join us at Festo Corp.
Thursday, May 31, from 1PM to 3PM

A Historical Guide to China and Chinese Immigration to Cincinnati

Week 4 – World Affairs Council Cultural Guides

Jin Kong, Greater Cincinnati Chinese Chamber of Commerce Board Chair, has been working at the Greater Cincinnati World Affairs Council (GCWAC) for six months through a fellowship with The Mission Continues. He is looking to “receive a better understanding of the populist sentiment towards immigrants in Cincinnati.” Through this research, Kong will be sharing weekly blog posts through GCWAC’s website on Chinese culture in Cincinnati. Click here to read more of his blogs.

China – Part 1 – A Historical Guide to China and Chinese Immigration to Cincinnati

Terracotta

China’s recorded history began some four-thousand years ago. Three dynasties preceded the unification of China in 221 BCE: Xia (2070 BCE), Shang (1600 BCE), Zhou (1046 BCE). The Zhou period is a time of flourishing civilization. The writing was codified and ironwork became more sophisticated. China saw the rise of philosophers such as Confucius and Lao-Zi (Taoism) in this period.

During the mid-Zhou dynasty, power was decentralized and China entered what is known as the “Spring and Autumn Waring Period” (722-221 BCE). Sun-Zi and The Art of War emerged during this time. China was fractured into seven kingdoms. In 221 BCE, the Kingdom of Qin subdued the other six and proclaimed its king, Ying Zheng, the First Emperor of China – “Qin ShiHuang.”

During Qin ShiHuang’s reign, writing and measurements were unified under a single system; government rule was centralized; trade was made easier by uniformed currency and standardized width of cart-wheels. Qin-ShiHuang was also famous for building the first section of The Great Wall of China and his “Terracotta Army” which accompanied him to his tomb.

Many dynasties followed Qin. Most notably the Tang Dynasty, which was known as China’s golden age (618-907 AD); the Song Dynasty, which saw great scientific and technological advancements (960-1279 AD); and Ming Dynasty, which saw the completion of the Great Wall and the Forbidden City (1368-1644 AD). The last dynasty of China, (Qing) was ruled by the Manchus and ended in 1911. The Qing dynasty was succeeded by China’s modern republic age and eventually saw the rise of the People’s Republic of China in 1949.

During the Qing dynasty (in 1868), the United States and China entered into the Burlingame Treaty. This treaty established a formal relationship between the two countries. China was granted “most favored nation” status and immigration were encouraged. The first wave of Chinese immigrants arrived in the United States between the 1850s to 1880s. They mostly settled along the coasts (in California or New York). Most Chinese immigrants were labors working to build railroads.

In the 1870s, there were repeated efforts to limit Chinese immigration to the United States. The Fifteen Passenger Bill of 1879 limited the number of Chinese passengers to 15 in any single voyage to the United States. President Rutherford B. Hayes vetoed the bill because it violated the terms of the Burlingame Treaty.

Chinese Exclusion

Following the veto, President Hayes sent James Burrill Angell to China and he successfully negotiated a new treaty allowing restrictions on Chinese immigration. Following the Angell Treaty of 1880 was the passage of the infamous Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882. This Act was not repealed until 1943 under the Magnuson Act. Following the repeal, the second wave of Chinese immigrants to the US began from the late 1970s to the present.

The first Chinese migrants in Ohio were mostly descendants of Chinese immigrants who had settled on the West Coast. A majority of them moved to northeastern Ohio (Cleveland area). Some came to Cincinnati and made this region their home. According to a local new paper report of the Census Bureau account, there were 17 Chinese living in Cincinnati in 1910 (“SEVENTEEN CHINESE: And Seven Japanese Lived in Cincinnati in 1910, Report Says.” SPECIAL DISPATCH TO THE ENQUIRER, Nov 28, 1914). However, as early as 1894, the Cincinnati Enquirer reported Chinese New Year Celebration by about 30 Chinese men led by a laundry shop owner Sam Kee (“‘SUN NIN,’: The Chinese New-Year’s Day, Celebrated By Cincinnati Celestials with Much Eclat.” Cincinnati Enquirer, Feb 6, 1894). In 1876, the first Chinese American reportedly voted in Cincinnati. (“The First Chinese Voter.” Cincinnati Enquirer, Apr 4, 1876). In 1912, the Enquirer reported the first woman and child immigrant moving to Cincinnati (“CHINESE: Wife and Child Coming To Take Up Their Residence in Cincinnati – Similar Distinction May Be Given Covington.” Cincinnati Enquirer, Sep 26, 1912). In 1914, the Cincinnati Enquirer reported  the first Chinese Baby born here to Mr. and Mrs. Wong Yie at their Vine Street restaurant (“CHINESE BABY, First To Be Born in Cincinnati, Is Christened Wong Gut Ting in Fathers Home.” Cincinnati Enquirer, Jun 8, 1914).

Today, thousands of Chinese descendants call the Greater Cincinnati region their home. Thousands more immigrate to Cincinnati to work or attend school. There are more than a dozen active Chinese community organizations in this region doing all sorts of charitable work. Most notably, the Greater Cincinnati Chinese Chamber of Commerce, the Cincinnati Chinese Society, the Chinese American Association of Cincinnati, the Cincinnati Chinese Church, and the Cincinnati Chinese Culture Learning Association.

Jin Kong is a fellow through Mission Continues working with GCWAC. Original articles found here.

The Greater Cincinnati World Affairs Council (GCWAC) is a 501(c)(3) international non-profit organization that builds global understanding and promotes international awareness through education, information, and exchange of people and ideas. We work in cooperation with the government, companies, as well as cultural and educational bodies. CLICK HERE for more information.

The Mission Continues is a national nonprofit organization that empowers veterans who are adjusting to life at home to find purpose through community impact. Their operations in cities across the country deploy veteran volunteers alongside non-profit partners and community leaders to solve some of the most challenging issues facing our communities: improving community education resources, eliminating food deserts, mentoring at-risk youth and more. Through this unique model, veterans build new skills and networks that help them successfully reintegrate into life after the military while making long-term, sustainable transformations in communities and inspiring future generations to serve. CLICK HERE for more information.