Watching World Cup can improve your Global Business Skills

By Eric McGraw

 

More than three billion people around the world are expected to watch a World Cup match some time in the next month, truly making it the world’s biggest game. Yet for all this global madness there is a major – and vocal – group in the United States who condemn soccer, or (gasp) football, by offering the following examples:

  1. There’s not enough scoring and therefore not exciting.
  2. All the fake injuries and flopping on the ground ruins “the beautiful game.”
  3. The U.S. doesn’t dominate football on a global scale.

It is clear these opinions stem from comparing America’s popular sports like American football, basketball and baseball to soccer.  True, many of our American heroes, both real and fictional, are derived from these homegrown sports, which shows what we value as a society.  It doesn’t matter whether or not you know what the difference between a striker and a fullback is but what others perceive as your response to soccer could say something about your mindset, personal character and global business skills.

The negative opinions on soccer above might reveal a bit of ethnocentrism and closed-mindedness, which is a major deal killer in global business.  Showing a bit of cultural appreciation and open-mindedness is a key factor in developing international relationships with your company staff, business partners and potential customers.

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Chinese Chamber adds leg-up to Silicon Valley pitch

Start-ups are always looking for a game-winning leg-up.

In the case of 3DLT, they got just what they needed from the Chinese Chamber.

Our executive director, Evan Brooks, was approached late Tuesday night to help the Northern Kentucky start-up, 3DLT, make their pitch to Chinese investors at Silicon Valley this weekend. Evan knew right away that the chamber had to pool all of their resources into this opportunity: After all, bringing Chinese investment to the region is our No. 1 priority.

See the Cincinnati Enquirer story here

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Chinese Chamber Member Named 2013 Ohio Exporter of the Year

Kevin Kahn Exporter of the Year
Kevin Kahn, president of K2 Industrial Controls, sits with his award May 29 during a Small Business Association dinner.

SBA Honors K2 Industrial Controls at Awards Dinner May 29

Kevin Kahn is not your ordinary, everyday American entrepreneur.

He grew up in New York, studied international politics and economics at Middlebury College in Vermont, and majored in East Asian studies at the University of Washington. He also has an MBA from the University of Southern California.

Oh and he loves to talk about hockey.

Mr. Kahn is the president of K2 Industrial Controls, a wholesale valve and fitting distributor based in Cincinnati, but operating mostly in China. In fact, K2 operates in eight cities in China. The company’s core business is exporting American-made valves and fittings to China for use mostly in the oil and gas industry.

According to their web site, K2 is “dedicated to partnering with small and medium sized manufacturers with commercially viable industrial technologies helping them enter into and successfully develop business in some of the most lucrative yet complicated markets in the world.”

As far as complicated and lucrative markets go, China tops the list. Nevertheless, that is the market where Mr. Kahn and his team thrive.

It’s really no wonder that K2 was named Ohio Exporter of 2013. We’re glad to have them as a Gold member and even happier to have Mr. Kahn on our board of directors.

Click here to see K2’s LinkedIn page and to connect with the company’s president.

World Bank: China Set to Pass U.S. Economy This Year

The big headlines in international news came following the release April 30 of an International Comparison Program report that suggests China’s economy will overtake the U.S. and India will rise to number three over Japan.

Of course, as with any report of this magnitude, you have to take the whole situation into perspective. The report relies heavily on a variable called purchasing power parity (PPP) that shows the power of the Renminbi in China becoming more powerful than the U.S. Dollar in the U.S.

Simply put, getting a hair cut in Beijing is far cheaper than the same quality hair cut in New York City. That’s a simple way of looking at it. The Financial Times did a great video explaining the report.

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