Intercultural Workshop Series #4: The Silk Road

Series #4: The Silk Road

Tuesday, June 29, 2021 from 9:00 AM to 9:40 AM EDT

The Silk Road was initiated and globalized by Chinese exploration and conquests in Central Asia. The Silk Road was and is a network of trade routes connecting the East and West, and was central to the economic, cultural, political, and religious interactions between these regions from the 2nd century BCE to the 18th century. The Silk Road primarily refers to the land but also sea routes connecting East Asia and Southeast Asia with South Asia, Persia, the Arabian Peninsula, East Africa and Southern Europe. The Silk Road trade played a significant role in the development of the civilizations of China, Korea, Japan, the Indian subcontinent, Iran, Europe, the Horn of Africa and Arabia, opening long-distance political and economic relations between these civilizations. Though silk was the major trade item exported from China, many other goods and ideas were exchanged, including religions (especially Buddhism), syncretic philosophies, sciences, and technologies like paper and gunpowder. So in addition to economic trade, the Silk Road was a route for cultural trade among the civilizations along its network.

Join us on June 29, 9 AM EDT for a discussion of how the Silk Road was formed and the impact on the world’s economy and politics.

Open statement from Midwest USA Chinese Chamber of Commerce

Dear Community Leaders,

solidarityThe Asian American communities are gravely saddened and concerned about the recent sharp increases in attacks and violence on law-abiding, hardworking Asian Americans. Asian Americans traditionally love this great country of ours. They are proud to contribute, to help build this  great country and serve in the armed forces of this great nation.

The Asian American communities are deeply concerned about the lack of safety these days and call for actions to return to civility and treat each other with respect, dignity, and equality, for which America is proudly known and standing.

Regards,

Lee Wong, US Army (retired) with over 20 years of active-duty service (24/7) to the nation
Chairman of the Board
Midwest USA Chinese Chamber of Commerce (fka. Greater Cincinnati Chinese Chamber of Commerce)


The following organizations and persons endorse the above statement:

  • Adam Hayden, Seeds of Peace / Kids4Peace
  • Aarti, Noah, & Zoe, junior high school students with Kids4Peace Cincinnati
  • Alfonso Cornejo, President, Hispanic Chamber Cincinnati USA
  • Allison Reynolds-Berry, Executive Director, Intercommunity Justice and Peace Center
  • Bakhtavar Desai, President, Zoroastrian Association of Ky, OH, & IN
  • Bao M. Nguyen, Asian American Cultural Association of Cincinnati 
  • Barry E. Cobb
  • Bleuzette Marshall, PhD, VP for Equity, Inclusion & Community Impact, University of Cincinnati
  • Brent Cooper, President & CEO, Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce
  • Bryan Wright, Executive Director, Cincinnati Compass
  • Carla D. Walker, CEO, think BIG strategies
  • Cathy Heldman, Regional Director, American Jewish Committee
  • Charleston Wang, Interethnic Council of Greater Cincinnati, Asian American Hour WAIF 88.3 FM
  • Charmaine McGuffey, Sheriff, Hamilton County
  • Chip Harrod, Board Chair Michael Hawkins, Tamie Sullivan, and Tammy Bennett, EquaSion
  • Chris Burns, City of Montgomery Diversity and Inclusion Committee
  • Cincinnati Regional Coalition Against Hate
  • Cynthia Cummins, Brueggeman Center for Dialogue
  • Daniel B. Cunningham, CEO, Long-Stanton Group
  • Daniel J. Hoffheimer, Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP
  • Denise Driehaus, Hamilton County Commissioner
  • Dr. Amir Izhar, Board Chair and Henry Hane, Executive Director, Islamic Center of Greater Cincinnati
  • Eliot K. Isaac, Police Chief, the Cincinnati Police Department
  • Eric H. Kearney, Esq., President & CEO, Greater Cincinnati & Northern Kentucky African American Chamber of Commerce
  • Felicity Tao, Greater Cincinnati Chinese Cultural Exchange Association
  • Geneva Blackmer, Program Director, the Interfaith Center at Miami University
  • Helen Rindsberg, President, Cincinnati Asian Art Society.
  • Inayat Malik MD, Past Board Chair, Islamic Center of Greater Cincinnati 
  • J. Neri , Executive Director, Greater Cincinnati Native American Coalition
  • Jackie Congedo, Director, Jewish Community Relations Council of Cincinnati
  • Jaipal Singh, CHAATRIK Architecture
  • James Buchanan, Board Chair, Interfaith Cincy and Foreign Policy Leadership Council
  • Jan Armstrong Cobb, EquaSion and A Mighty Stream
  • Jan-Michele Lemon Kearney, Cincinnati City Councilmember
  • Jeff Liu, President & CEO, Fuyao Group North America
  • Jessica Baron, EquaSion
  • Jill P. Meyer, President & CEO, Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber
  • Joseph A. Hinson, President & CEO, West Chester ▪ Liberty Chamber Alliance
  • Joe Mallory, President, Cincinnati NAACP
  • Justin Kirschner, Associate Director, Jewish Community Relations Council
  • Kazuya Sato, President, Cincinnati Chapter Japanese American Citizens League
  • Koji Sado, Board President, and Anne Golden, Executive Director,  Japan America Society of Greater Cincinnati
  • Kristin Burgoyne, Executive Director, RefugeeConnect
  • Lynn Tramonte, Ohio Immigrant Alliance
  • Majid Samarghandi, CEO, Triton Services Inc
  • Malcolm and Priscilla Dunn
  • Margaret A. Fox, Executive Director, Metropolitan Area Religious Coalition of Cincinnati
  • Mark Jeffreys, CEO 4Sight and Cincinnati City Council Candidate
  • Marlaina A. Leppert-Wahl , Ph.D., Wilmington College
  • Marvin Cunningham, President, Long-Stanton Mfg.
  • Marvin Frank Thomas, Sr. Presiding Bishop, Second Episcopal District Christian Methodist Episcopal Church
  • Mary A. McDonald, Mayor, City of Trotwood
  • Mary Carol Melton, Festival of Faiths Steering Committee
  • Michael Howard, CEO, Nichefire
  • Mitchel Livingston, VP Emeritus and Professor, University of Cincinnati
  • Michele Young, Cincinnati AJC Black Jewish Table of Understanding
  • Michelle Harpenau, Executive Director, World Affairs Council & Michele Mansfield, Board Chair, World Affairs Council
  • Miriam Jackobs, Women’s Interfaith Network of Cincinnati
  • Paige Williams, Dear Art Academy of Cincinnati Students, Faculty, Staff, Board of Trustees and Alumni
  • Pastor Henry Zorn, Lutheran Church of the Resurrection
  • Pastor Nicole Kelly, Lutheran Church of the Resurrection, Anderson Township
  • Paul M. Booth, Cincinnati Office of Human Relations
  • Patrick Lonneman, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center
  • Peng Zhang, Society of Chinese American Professors & Scientists
  • Rabbi Gary P. Zola, Past President, MLK Coalition of Greater Cincinnati
  • Rabbi George Barnard, Northern Hills Synagogue
  • Rabbi Karen Thomashow, the Greater Cincinnati Board of Rabbis
  • Rabbi Meredith Kahan and Board President John G. Cobey, Rockdale Temple
  • Rebecca Newlin, Board Chair, the Interfaith Center at Miami University
  • Rev. Heather Buchanan Wiseman   St. Thomas Episcopal Church
  • Rev. P. Marshall Wiseman   Christ Church Cathedral 
  • Rev. Paula M. Jackson, the Church of Our Saviour/La Iglesia de Nuestro Salvador
  • Rev. Stacey Midge, Mount Auburn Presbyterian Church
  • Rick and Zeinab Schwen
  • Roula Allouch, member of EquaSion and CAIR
  • S. Nemat Moussavian, M.D., EquaSion and the Islamic Center of Greater Cincinnati
  • Samina Sohail MD, Islamic Center of Greater Cincinnati
  • Shakila T Ahmad, Allergy & Asthma Specialty Center
  • Sharline Martin, President of the Board, Indian American Chamber of Commerce of Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky
  • Sikh Community of Greater Cincinnati
  • Stephan Vance and Dr. Deborah Vance, Baha’i Faith and EquaSion
  • Teresa M. Davis
  • Terrie Puckett, Executive Director, the Grail in the US
  • The Nancy and David Wolf Holocaust and Humanity Center
  • Umama Alam, EquaSion 
  • William Madges, Faculty Director, Edward B. Brueggeman Center for Dialogue, Xavier University
  • Yvette Johnson-Hegge, Executive Coordinator, YWCA Cincinnati
  • Zejiang Yang, Sichuan-Chongqing Friendship Association

A Historical Guide to China and Chinese Immigration to Cincinnati

Week 4 – World Affairs Council Cultural Guides

Jin Kong, Greater Cincinnati Chinese Chamber of Commerce Board Chair, has been working at the Greater Cincinnati World Affairs Council (GCWAC) for six months through a fellowship with The Mission Continues. He is looking to “receive a better understanding of the populist sentiment towards immigrants in Cincinnati.” Through this research, Kong will be sharing weekly blog posts through GCWAC’s website on Chinese culture in Cincinnati. Click here to read more of his blogs.

China – Part 1 – A Historical Guide to China and Chinese Immigration to Cincinnati

Terracotta

China’s recorded history began some four-thousand years ago. Three dynasties preceded the unification of China in 221 BCE: Xia (2070 BCE), Shang (1600 BCE), Zhou (1046 BCE). The Zhou period is a time of flourishing civilization. The writing was codified and ironwork became more sophisticated. China saw the rise of philosophers such as Confucius and Lao-Zi (Taoism) in this period.

During the mid-Zhou dynasty, power was decentralized and China entered what is known as the “Spring and Autumn Waring Period” (722-221 BCE). Sun-Zi and The Art of War emerged during this time. China was fractured into seven kingdoms. In 221 BCE, the Kingdom of Qin subdued the other six and proclaimed its king, Ying Zheng, the First Emperor of China – “Qin ShiHuang.”

During Qin ShiHuang’s reign, writing and measurements were unified under a single system; government rule was centralized; trade was made easier by uniformed currency and standardized width of cart-wheels. Qin-ShiHuang was also famous for building the first section of The Great Wall of China and his “Terracotta Army” which accompanied him to his tomb.

Many dynasties followed Qin. Most notably the Tang Dynasty, which was known as China’s golden age (618-907 AD); the Song Dynasty, which saw great scientific and technological advancements (960-1279 AD); and Ming Dynasty, which saw the completion of the Great Wall and the Forbidden City (1368-1644 AD). The last dynasty of China, (Qing) was ruled by the Manchus and ended in 1911. The Qing dynasty was succeeded by China’s modern republic age and eventually saw the rise of the People’s Republic of China in 1949.

During the Qing dynasty (in 1868), the United States and China entered into the Burlingame Treaty. This treaty established a formal relationship between the two countries. China was granted “most favored nation” status and immigration were encouraged. The first wave of Chinese immigrants arrived in the United States between the 1850s to 1880s. They mostly settled along the coasts (in California or New York). Most Chinese immigrants were labors working to build railroads.

In the 1870s, there were repeated efforts to limit Chinese immigration to the United States. The Fifteen Passenger Bill of 1879 limited the number of Chinese passengers to 15 in any single voyage to the United States. President Rutherford B. Hayes vetoed the bill because it violated the terms of the Burlingame Treaty.

Chinese Exclusion

Following the veto, President Hayes sent James Burrill Angell to China and he successfully negotiated a new treaty allowing restrictions on Chinese immigration. Following the Angell Treaty of 1880 was the passage of the infamous Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882. This Act was not repealed until 1943 under the Magnuson Act. Following the repeal, the second wave of Chinese immigrants to the US began from the late 1970s to the present.

The first Chinese migrants in Ohio were mostly descendants of Chinese immigrants who had settled on the West Coast. A majority of them moved to northeastern Ohio (Cleveland area). Some came to Cincinnati and made this region their home. According to a local new paper report of the Census Bureau account, there were 17 Chinese living in Cincinnati in 1910 (“SEVENTEEN CHINESE: And Seven Japanese Lived in Cincinnati in 1910, Report Says.” SPECIAL DISPATCH TO THE ENQUIRER, Nov 28, 1914). However, as early as 1894, the Cincinnati Enquirer reported Chinese New Year Celebration by about 30 Chinese men led by a laundry shop owner Sam Kee (“‘SUN NIN,’: The Chinese New-Year’s Day, Celebrated By Cincinnati Celestials with Much Eclat.” Cincinnati Enquirer, Feb 6, 1894). In 1876, the first Chinese American reportedly voted in Cincinnati. (“The First Chinese Voter.” Cincinnati Enquirer, Apr 4, 1876). In 1912, the Enquirer reported the first woman and child immigrant moving to Cincinnati (“CHINESE: Wife and Child Coming To Take Up Their Residence in Cincinnati – Similar Distinction May Be Given Covington.” Cincinnati Enquirer, Sep 26, 1912). In 1914, the Cincinnati Enquirer reported  the first Chinese Baby born here to Mr. and Mrs. Wong Yie at their Vine Street restaurant (“CHINESE BABY, First To Be Born in Cincinnati, Is Christened Wong Gut Ting in Fathers Home.” Cincinnati Enquirer, Jun 8, 1914).

Today, thousands of Chinese descendants call the Greater Cincinnati region their home. Thousands more immigrate to Cincinnati to work or attend school. There are more than a dozen active Chinese community organizations in this region doing all sorts of charitable work. Most notably, the Greater Cincinnati Chinese Chamber of Commerce, the Cincinnati Chinese Society, the Chinese American Association of Cincinnati, the Cincinnati Chinese Church, and the Cincinnati Chinese Culture Learning Association.

Jin Kong is a fellow through Mission Continues working with GCWAC. Original articles found here.

The Greater Cincinnati World Affairs Council (GCWAC) is a 501(c)(3) international non-profit organization that builds global understanding and promotes international awareness through education, information, and exchange of people and ideas. We work in cooperation with the government, companies, as well as cultural and educational bodies. CLICK HERE for more information.

The Mission Continues is a national nonprofit organization that empowers veterans who are adjusting to life at home to find purpose through community impact. Their operations in cities across the country deploy veteran volunteers alongside non-profit partners and community leaders to solve some of the most challenging issues facing our communities: improving community education resources, eliminating food deserts, mentoring at-risk youth and more. Through this unique model, veterans build new skills and networks that help them successfully reintegrate into life after the military while making long-term, sustainable transformations in communities and inspiring future generations to serve. CLICK HERE for more information.

Welcoming University of Cincinnati’s New Chinese Students

cincinnati-greetings-from

 

Greetings and welcome to Cincinnati.

Or in other words:

同学们,欢迎!

University of Cincinnati welcomed nearly 1,000 new international students to its ranks this week. They landed at Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport (more colloquially known as CVG) early this week and received simple toiletries — how nice — and a free ride to their new homes.

Oh yeah and one third (about 250 students) are from China. The other large groups come from India and Saudi Arabia mostly, but our sources; i.e. the international office, say the largest group is the Chinese students.

We’re throwing a party for them tomorrow (Friday, Aug. 15) from 2 to 5 pm at the 86 Club on Short Vine. If you have the time, come join us. We’ll have food, music, games and prizes. A panel of Chinese professionals who live in Cincinnati will also join us to talk about life in the Queen City.

Our goal is to engage this community and help to thrive in Cincinnati. We hope they study hard, graduate fast and get jobs locally. The Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber of Commerce has found that 72 percent of international students want to stay in Cincinnati. It makes sense to help them gain the best opportunities possible.